FAQs

Is acceleration, or the advancing of one or two grades, required?

Acceleration is required and is one of Latin School's many distinctive characteristics.  Educational institutions have the responsibility to place students in courses that meet their individual needs. Research confirms that the notion that age equals grade overlooks individual differences and that academic ability and inclination are much more accurate determinants of placement. 

How demanding is the first year?

Coursework for the first year is challenging but reasonable and students typically spend one to two hours a night on homework. The Prep and Freshman Study Skills courses, Mentor Center, Tutorial and close personal attention from the faculty, help to ease the transition and foster satisfaction for the first year student.

Where do Covington Latin School students come from?

Latin School draws extensively throughout Northern Kentucky (7 counties), Greater Cincinnati and Indiana. Students come from an array of educational backgrounds: 52% previously attended Catholic schools, 37% attended public schools, 8% were home-educated and 3% attended non-Catholic private schools.  Students of color constitute nearly 15% of enrollment. We maintain a deep and abiding commitment to our Catholic identity, while welcoming students of other faiths (nearly 30% of our students are non-Catholic).

What exactly are the Prep years?

The Prep years are the 7th and 8th grade years available to students admitted while in 5th or 6th grade year (thereby accelerating two years or one year, respectively). The Prep year eases the transition into Latin School by acclimating students to our expectations and culture, prior to the more rigorous Form I (Freshman) year. Of new students entering Covington Latin School in the Fall of 2015 more than 75% entered as preps.

Is tuition assistance available?

We believe that no deserving student should be denied a Covington Latin education due to demonstrable financial need. The generosity of our alumni and parent donors enables us to offer tuition assistance to nearly one third of CLS students, across a broad spectrum of financial circumstances. 

What steps are taken to acclimate incoming students?

During the first two weeks of the new school year, an extensive and comprehensive orientation program is offered that helps each student meet new friends, adjust to the routine and get involved in class and student body activities. The House System also allows incoming students to form relationships with not only students in their year, but throughout all grades. 

Does the transition to college come easily?

In alumni surveys, the vast majority report exceptional academic success and normal social adjustment. In all levels of schooling, readiness, responsibility and emotional maturity are much stronger predictors of success than age. Indeed, 98% of our graduates hold bachelor’s degrees and 48% hold master's or terminal degrees (MD, JD, PhD, etc.). 

How many students take the Advanced Placement (AP®) exams?

In 2014-2015, 115 AP examinations were taken by Latin School students in 9 subject areas. The 2015 graduating class averaged a 3.51 on the examinations overall and included 15 AP Scholars (achieving a “3” or better in three or more subject areas).

What are the school hours?

The school day begins at 8:00 am and ends at 3:00 pm. The campus is open from 7:00 am until 4:00 pm every day (our vestibule is open to students needing to stay later).

Is transportation easily available?

Given the geodiversity of our students, many families choose to join (or create) car pools by using our zip code-sorted CLS family contact list, which is mailed to all parents mid-summer.